Enduring Ethics – Here Come the Judge

judge eastwoodHere come the judge!” is a popular phrase captured in our music and pop culture.  It can be good news if he’s coming to take down the bad guy.  But if, when he gets closer, he looks more problematic than the bad guy, some ancient words from God to Habakkuk become important.

Habakkuk’s struggle was… “do I tolerate the injustice and idolatry I see rampant in my own country or do I invite God’s judgment, which ultimately means an invading army more godless and wicked than the place I live in?

His dilemma could be ours.  Culture can need correction, but that often involves trauma.  Which do you prefer?  Cultural decay or corrective trauma?  The later often involves the strong man; the judge.  Politics and church revivals don’t always get it done.

So Habakkuk took his struggle to God.  And God responded in typical fashion:

  • God did not answer Habakkuk with an exhaustive ethical justification for what He was about to do
  • God did answer Habakkuk with a call to faith – to trust in His appropriate timing and judgment on those needing correction and those doing the correcting

Ultimately, behind the strong man or judge, is God.  And He had these things to say to Habakkuk (and to us) regarding His view of the strong man and what his end would be – every time.

How does this help us today?

Justice, whether personal, civic or international is seldom a choice between Sunday School and Serial Murder.  There are shades and nuances, ebbs and flows.  So it’s comforting to know there is One who follows it all and will ultimately hold each instrument of judgment accountable.

It’s also important to realize that breaking news is often premature.  What’s news today is often not the full story.  There is a day coming when the full impact of all strong men will be revealed.  Their role in history will be fully understood.  But that day is not today.

We are given a survival tool; a kind of Swiss army knife by which to read international and economic news:  faith.  This multi-functional tool allows us to proceed in peace when all is crashing down around us.  It allows us to move with confidence when culture is rotten and the corrective action coming seems even more so.

The strong man God used to correct Habakkuk’s culture did indeed come – Babylonia.  But even in its strength, there were those living by faith who sent the strong man a message:  “I’m not gonna bow to you!”.  This is a message we sometimes need to send in our own day.  And the day did indeed arrive when the One True Judge came.  And the strong man fell in a single night.

Justice and justice.  Here comes the Judge – the Big One!  Live by it.

-Anthony

God Calling… Charting Faith

Minard ChartI love good charts.

They can help us see perspectives otherwise not easily visible.  Perhaps the greatest one ever was constructed by Charles Joseph Minard, portraying the losses suffered by Napoleon’s army in the Russian campaign of 1812. Using a thick beige-to-black band, he shows the size of the army beginning at the Polish-Russian border and follows its reduction to Moscow and back in the bitterly cold winter.  The army size is tied to temperature and time scales.  It’s a masterpiece in graphic depiction.  It makes the following point very clear:  Napoleon’s army was defeated by poor decision making and winter weather, not another army.

Consider now another chart, not nearly as famous as Minard’s:  mine.

Faith Fight over TimeIt’s a crude attempt at charting faith – the thing that’s most required if you are going to answer God’s call.  It was absolutely essential for Gideon.  And it’s going to be essential for you.

This chart tracks three variables from Judges 6-7:

  • Green = The size of Gideon’s forces, starting from when he was called (that would be one) through to the greatest number (32,000 or so) and back down to 301.
  • Red = The size of the opposition’s forces, peaking at 135,000 and eventually shrinking to zero.  Where the number starts cannot be identified, but I’m guess somewhere around 25,000 to 35,000 (call it an occupation force).
  • Orange = Gideon’s physical/mental stress level.  It’s the variable hardest to pin down because the Bible gives us only clues without clear markers.  In other words…
    • what was his stress level working alone in the wine press prior to the call?
    • what was his stress level when an angel appeared and issued a call to leadership without any identified followers?
    • what was his stress level when the great battle began; 301 facing 135,000?
    • and what was his stress level when he was chasing an enemy on the run on foreign soil when his men were exhausted?

While the Bible doesn’t give us an actual number, we can anticipate movement up or down.

What do you notice as you consider the chart?

First, it becomes apparent the fight of faith has a general emotional/physical “footprint” that would keep anyone out of their comfort zone.  It’s not blissful.  It’s not a consistent spiritual “high”.  Instead, it’s a roller coaster of highs and lows.

What does that mean?  It means you cannot look at your “heart” or “feelings” to tell you whether to start, stop or finish.  It’s the call that matters.  If Gideon would have check his heart for directions, at several points through these chapters he might have bailed.  Any reasonable person would have.

Second, the physical resources at Gideon’s disposal never come close to matching up well with the forces of the eastern armies.  Gideon, at his best, had about 32,000 men.  The forces of the east had 135,000.  It was never even close.

What does that mean?  It means you cannot make your decision on whether to obey the call based upon visible resources.  At no point did Gideon ever have a number that would cause any military leader worth his “salt” to press the attack.  And when Gideon started to like his numbers, God stepped in and said “too big; too many – we have to thin these out lest the wrong person get credit!” Early on Gideon settled that the power in his punch was God and God alone.

Third, Gideon’s stress level was highest after the main battle was over.  When the red line is well past its peak and heading toward zero (certain demise of the eastern armies), the orange line is just getting started, like some runaway growth stock.  Gideon’s most trying time may have been after the crowd left the primary victory celebration, and he knew that his original force of 300 had to chase the rest of the enemy into foreign soil.  He received no help, no food and no sleep.  Exhaustion was his only companion as he pushed his men forward based on a call only his ears heard.

What does that mean?  It means finishing the call is sometimes harder than the main battle.  We celebrate and publish the book or create a seminar too early.   89% of the enemy was routed and leaving town.  But that number has nothing to do with his call.  Gideon was called to deliver God’s people, not simply reduce the enemy forces.  Enough is not enough until the call is completed – and that may be the hardest part.

Were you able to ask Gideon “was it worth it?“  What do you think his answer would be?

What might yours be if you answered God’s call today?

-Anthony

God Calling… Family and Fleece

The best measure of a spiritual life is not its ecstasies but its obedience.”  (Oswald Chambers)

I think there’s a common misconception about following God (or “doing the right thing” in common parlance):  it’s easy and the bleachers are full of supporters.  Nothing could be further from the truth.  The path of faith, ethics, and change is lonely.

And what’s most surprising is who is not in the bleachers when you take your first step.

In the story of Gideon, hard on the heels of his inspirational interview with an angel of God, he was instructed to tear down the altar of worship to a false God (Baal).  The one of which his own family was assigned the role of caretaker on behalf of their village.

That meant embarrassing Dad.  That meant stirring up the anger of the whole town. That meant difficulty.  That meant taking the first step alone.  So Gideon made two critical decisions:

  • first, he decided to obey God.  The angel told him to take the first step toward realizing his full role as “mighty warrior” that very night.  There was no time allowed for consideration.  No time to meditate, no time to take a poll of wise elders, no time to consider life markers, no time to check with the family to see how everyone felt about being “most hated” in their community the next day.
  • second, he decided to do his work at night.  Why?  Because he was afraid.  It’s been said that courage is the assessment that something is more important than fear.  Gideon showed courage but he also showed a little fear.  And that is something you and I can relate to.

Day two of Gideon’s obedience dawns, the deed is done, and the town is ticked off.  They show up ready to kill him.  Then something amazing happens:  the Father Gideon has placed in a most awkward situation stepped out to defend his son’s actions…

“If Baal really is a god, he can defend himself when someone breaks down his altar!”

Makes sense.  The town people thought so too.  And so Gideon got a cool nicknameJerub-Baal, or “Baal Fighter”.  In our day is would be something like “Idol Smasher”.

This first step of obedience is not unusual in the Bible.  Those God calls often have to take the first steps alone and in the face of family disagreement.  Those closest to you are not always God’s advisors.  Be careful.

As Oswald Chambers also once suggested, when God gives us an assignment, the worst thing we can do is consult with another person.  Moses would agree.  So would Noah and Daniel.  And so would Jesus, who not only modeled obedience over family, but redefined true family by obedience (Matthew 10:37-39, Matthew 8:21-22, Matthew 12:46-50).

Very difficult.  But it changes the world.

Guys like Phinehas (Numbers 25:1-13) are special because only one thing matters to them – God.  And while others are consulting or politicking, folks like Phinehas act decisively.  And a nation is saved.

This story tends to gain everyone’s attention because of a couple of nights when Baal Fighter laid out the fleece looking for confirmation.  But Gideon didn’t do that because he was deciding whether or not to be obedient.  He did it because he’d already started.

Have you started… to obey?  Or are you still laying out fleeces?

-Anthony

God Calling… Are You Sure?

It’s one of my favorite comedy sketches of all time – Bill Cosby playing Noah.  As he plays his character, the audience imagines Noah in his woodworking shop, suddenly interrupted by an unseen voice.  God begins to speak with Noah, telling him what he must do.  After a moment, the call seems so impossible, so overwhelming, that Noah pauses and asks… “who is this really?

In Noah’s case it really was God.  In Judges chapter 6, it also was God – calling upon another unlikely candidate to do something impossible.  His name was Gideon.  And the typical path toward figuring out whether God is speaking to someone regarding a call was not really open to him.  If you are thinking God maybe calling you to some task, effort or great work, what counsel if usually offered?

Well, it’s usually stuff like… talk to your family, seek wise counsel, pray, meditate, read scripture, test for an open door, examine the resources available to support it, consider what simple wisdom would suggest, ask… What is my heart saying?, consider life experience markers, and so forth.  These things are kind of like typical caller ID settings for God.

But not much of that works in Gideon’s story.  He didn’t have time to talk to family; matter of fact, his first act of obedience was to offend his immediate family and the town he lived in.  He didn’t have a chance to seek wise counsel because his obedience was demanded that very night of the day he was called.  He didn’t have time to meditate on scripture or do much praying.  As for an open door, what he was being asked to do was so absurdly impossible, confining the task to something entered through a door would be like saying going to the moon requires a little money.  As for what “was his heart saying” or “what would wisdom suggest“, the answer to both would have likely been “are you crazy?!!!

What was he being asked to do?  Things typical of the called…

  • see himself as God saw him
  • adjust his explanation of reality
  • believe that his strength was enough to face a terrifying task
  • refuse to look at his credentials when considering the call
  • believe that God would be with him to accomplish the call

It’s easy to think this is the exception rather than the rule.  But a broad study of the Bible shows otherwise.  It’s not unusual for God’s calls to come a little “edgy”.  They shake us up.  They scare us.  Reread the call of Moses, Noah, Jeremiah, Isaiah, John, Paul, and others.  Not many have much to do with open doors, wise counsel, or life markers. No, the call of God (in the Bible anyway) more often has these earmarks.  These are the proper caller ID settings for God.  God’s call comes…

  • as a statement of divine fact that requires faith to believe
  • often to one, not a committee or a family
  • through a messenger – still God speaking, but through the mouth of an angel or man
  • in confusion – and that’s why it comes in the first place; because order is needed out of chaos
  • without evidence – something that’s always in the future
  • with a promise of God’s presence

Hail mighty office worker, teacher, waiter, or bus driver!  Would God ever call you to something difficult? 

Before you say “not me“, reconsider Gideon’s call.  That voice you hear in the whine pit of your daily grind could be a call from God for you.  It would be so sad if your God-Caller ID had the wrong settings so you thought it was for someone else.

-Anthony